President Ali meets Conservation International-Guyana representatives, discusses “Green-Gray Infrastructure”

President of Guyana, Dr Irfaan Ali, along with its Cabinet members, held a meeting with the Conservation International-Guyana representatives on Tuesday, January 25, 2022, at the President's office.

Georgetown: President of Guyana, Dr Irfaan Ali, along with its Cabinet members, held a meeting with the Conservation International-Guyana representatives on Tuesday, January 25, 2022, at the President’s office. Significant discussions took place between the government and CI’s officials. 

During the meet, CI’s Senior Advisor and former Executive Director, Mr Damian Fernandes, delivered a “Green-Gray Infrastructure” presentation to government officials. This is the infrastructure that mixes the conservation and restoration of nature, including natural coastal buffers such as mangroves and seagrasses, with conventional approaches (such as concrete dams and seawalls).

The head of the state has highlighted the merits of the presentation, saying that the way forward must be strategic & must include all relevant stakeholders while taking into account the country’s national development priorities.

The Cabinet members who joined the meet were: the Minister of Agriculture – Zulfikar Mustapha, the Minister of Public Works – Bishop Juan Edghill, the Minister of Tourism, Industry and Commerce – Oneidge Walrond and the Minister within the Ministry of Public Works – Deodat Indar.  

Besides them, the representatives from the National Agricultural Research and Extension Institute (NAREI) and other stakeholders were virtually present for the engagement.

Meanwhile, further discussions will take place soon on the matter, which will be led by the Vice-President of Guyana, Dr Bharrat Jagdeo and the Office of Climate Change with all of the relevant stakeholders is set to take place soon.

This grey infrastructure includes the structure of the dams, seawalls, roads, pipes and water treatment plants. Adapting to the escalating impacts of climate breakdown — particularly for coastlines facing sea-level rise and stronger storms — requires changing our infrastructure.