Protest against Japan’s nuclear water waste plan: More than 30 S.Korean students shave their heads

more than 30 South Korean college students shaved their heads to demonstrate their protest on Japan

In front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul, more than 30 South Korean college students shaved their heads to demonstrate their protest on Japan
In front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul, more than 30 South Korean college students shaved their heads to demonstrate their protest on Japan

South Korean: In front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul, more than 30 South Korean college students shaved their heads to demonstrate their protest on Japan’s decision to discharge water from its crippled Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea.

According to information, police officials regularly dispersed crowds, who chanted and carried placards but did not obstruct the event from taking place. However, there is an anti-pandemic ban on meetings more prominent than 10 individuals.

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The shaved demonstrators were wrapped in protective sheets emblazoned with messages denouncing the Japanese plan and calling for it to be abandoned.

Japan’s declaration ignited the agitation:

Japan declared last week its plan of action to release about 1.25 million tones of wastewater gathered from the bowels of the deformed Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power-station. 

Information revealed that “The water to be discharged into the Pacific Ocean includes tritium, a radioactive hydrogen isotope with a half-life of over 12 years. The uninvited news has prompted uproar both within Japan and amid neighboring nations.

Three nuclear reactors at the Fukushima plant experienced meltdowns in the obsequies of an earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. Molten fuel debris heated through steel containment containers and into the respective bases of the bioreactor buildings. 

Ever since operators have pumped water by the ruins to intercept the debris from blistering and causing additional damage, they have also accumulated all the contaminated water: It now fills more innumerable than 1000 steel tanks compressed onto the Fukushima campus.

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For over a decade, governments have been retained in a messy, challenging, frustrating, even Sisyphean business, flushing the impoverished footprint of the power-station with water to keep the slumped nuclear-fuel from that place, triggering a chain-reaction.

The meltdowns left parlous uranium fuel in miscellaneous clumps amid the remains below. The only way to cool the disappeared uranium is to flood the most hazardous areas of the Fukushima Daiichi association with circulating in sea-water. Radioactive ground-water and waste-water have been stored on-site to circumvent contact with individuals and the environment.