DLP’s Response to the Minimum Wage Increase

The suggestion from the Democratic Labour Party's (DLP) Spokesperson on Labour Courie Cox, who said that while the regime is patting itself

DLP's Response to the Minimum Wage Increase
DLP's Response to the Minimum Wage Increase

Barbados: Courie Cox, Spokesperson on Labour of the Democratic Labour Party, stated an immediate press release.

In its bid to increase the minimum wage Government needs to go back to the drawing board and include the protection of low-income workers.

The suggestion from the Democratic Labour Party’s (DLP) Spokesperson on Labour Courie Cox, who said that while the regime is patting itself on the back for what is a worthwhile initiative, they need to demonstrate a holistic understanding of the concept of increasing minimum wage and its effects.

“The DLP fully supports the Government for looking out for the improved welfare of these persons and helping them to better maintain workers and their families, during this tough pandemic,” Cox said.

“However, it is almost impossible for a minimum wage increase to occur without some disruption in the labour market. 

Instead of paying lip service, the administration needs to ensure that workers’ protection is documented and included as part of its policy framework. 

It must also stipulate that employers take care of their workers because worker protection cannot be left to the whims and fancies of employers, especially when the most manageable cost for a company to adjust its labour cost.”

Cox charged that for the last 24 plus months since the government has been in office, it has failed to anticipate the psychological impact of its policy decisions on workers and citizens of this country. 

He said an increase in the minimum wage could restrict employment growth if capitalists ask employees to perform multiple job functions, leading to workplace stress and reducing productivity.

“With an increase in the minimum wage, some jobs will now take on added appeal, increasing competitiveness for job placement. This can lead to workers tolerating poor conditions to keep their jobs. 

Besides, an increased minimum wage can render the cost of human performed jobs uncompetitive, resulting in a shift to more automated forms of operational performance, such as telephone answering systems or self-serve counters,” he contended.

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